Miss Kirsten Beyermann | Hand Surgery Salisbury
Information on hand conditions treated in Salisbury
hand surgery salisbury, carpal tunnel syndrome, dupuytren's contracture, ganglion cyst, trigger finger, hand arthritis, hand surgery, hand conditions
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Hand Surgery Salisbury

The information outlined below on common conditions and treatments is provided as a guide only and it is not intended to be comprehensive.

 

Discussion with Miss Beyermann is important to answer any questions that you may have. For information about any additional conditions not featured within the site, please contact us for more information or go to the ASSH website.

ANATOMY OF THE HAND

The human hand has five fingers and 27 bones, not including the sesamoid bone, the number of which varies between people, 14 of which are the phalanges (proximal, intermediate and distal) of the fingers. The metacarpal bones connect the fingers and the carpal bones of the wrist. Each human hand has five metacarpals and eight carpal bones. Among humans, the hands play an important function in body language and sign language.

 

Learn more about the different parts of the hand here.

COMMON CONDITIONS OF THE HAND
ARTHRITIS

Arthritis—literally, “inflamed joint”—can affect any joint in the body, including the joints between the 29 bones of the wrist, hand, and fingers. Arthritis of the hand can hurt and keep you from being able to do what you want or need to do. The most common forms of arthritis in the hand are osteoarthritis, post-traumatic arthritis (after an injury), and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease in which the smooth cartilage that covers the bone surfaces at the joints either is injured or wears over time.

 

For more information on the symptoms and treatment of arthritis, please visit the ASSH website here.

CUBITAL TUNNEL SYNDROME

Cubital tunnel syndrome is compression or irritation of the ulnar nerve in a tunnel on the inside of the elbow (where your ‘funny bone’ is). The ulnar nerve provides sensation to the little finger and part of the ring finger, and power to the small muscles within the hand.

 

For more information on the symptoms and treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome, please visit the BSSH website here.

DUPUYTRENS CONTRACTURE

Dupuytren’s contracture (also referred to as Dupuytren’s disease) is a common condition that usually arises in middle age or later and is more common in men than women. Firm nodules appear in the ligaments just beneath the skin of the palm of the hand, and in some cases they extend to form cords that can prevent the finger straightening completely. The nodules and cords may be associated with small pits in the skin. Nodules over the back of the finger knuckles (Garrod’s knuckle pads) and lumps on the soles of the feet are seen in some people with Dupuytren’s disease.

 

For more information on the symptoms and treatment of dupuytren’s contracture, please visit the BSSH website here.

HAND FRACTURES

A fracture (break) can occur in any of the bones in the hand. The fracture can be simple (two fragments) or comminuted (many fragments). The fracture can be closed (no break in the skin) or open (compound) where there is a break in the skin over the fracture. Fractures can be complicated by the involvement of the joints at either end of the bone (Intra-articular fracture). Fractures may occur as part of a more complex injury where there has been damage to other tissues such as tendons, nerves and blood vessels.

 

For more information on the symptoms and treatment of hand fractures, please visit the BSSH website here.

GANGLION CYST

Ganglion cysts are the commonest type of swelling the hand. They contain a thick clear liquid called synovial fluid, which is the body’s lubricant in joints and in the tunnels through which some tendons run. Although ganglion cysts can arise from any joint or tendon tunnel, there are four common locations in the hand and wrist – in the middle of the back of the wrist, on the front of the wrist at the base of the thumb, at the base of a finger on the palmar side, and on the back of an end joint of a finger.

 

For more information on the symptoms and treatment of ganglion, please visit the BSSH website here.

NERVE DAMAGE

A nerve injury can occur when the finger or hand is cut, overstretched, crushed or burned. Symptoms include numbness and difficulty moving the affected area.

 

Treatment depends on the severity of the injury, and may include rest, immobilization, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery.

 

For more information on the symptoms and treatment of nerve injury, please visit the BSSH website here.

TENDON / LIGAMENT REPAIR

If any of the tendons in your hand are damaged, surgery may be needed to repair them and help restore movement in the affected fingers or thumb.

 

For more information on the symptoms and treatment of tendon injury, please visit the BSSH website here.

TRIGGER FINGER

Trigger finger is a painful condition in which a finger or thumb clicks or locks as it is bent towards the palm.

 

For more information on the symptoms and treatment of trigger finger or thumb, please visit the BSSH website here.

 

Discussion with Miss Beyermann is important to answer any questions that you may have. For information about any additional conditions not featured within the site, please contact us for more information.

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